Tag Archive: Insects

Benefit from Beneficial Insects

Adult Ladybug. Photo Credit: James Castner University of Florida A number of summers ago, I noticed whiteflies on a confederate rose plant in my landscape. I considered using an insecticide to control the whiteflies but decided against doing so after taking a closer look. What I found was a population of ladybugs – eggs, larvae, …

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Permanent link to this article: http://leon.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/05/12/benefit-from-beneficial-insects/

Monitoring for Common Lawn Insects

Spittlebug damage on centipedegrass. Photo credit: Larry Williams UF/IFAS Mole crickets, chinch bugs and spittlebugs are common lawn insect pests to begin watching for this time of year. Mole crickets can be active in lawns spring through fall, but the best window of opportunity to control them is in June and July. Soap flushing is …

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Permanent link to this article: http://leon.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/04/13/monitoring-for-common-lawn-insects/

Stop and Take Notice of Beneficial Insects

This spring, most garden plants are putting on lots of tender new growth. The lush foliage is like a free lunch to aphids, whiteflies, mealybugs and thrips. Before broad spectrum insecticides are used to control these pests, consider the impact on beneficial insects. Insecticides that don’t measurably harm predatory beneficial insects include insecticidal soaps and all season horticultural …

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Permanent link to this article: http://leon.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/04/07/stop-and-take-notice-of-beneficial-insects/

Insects Take a Break in Winter, Which Will Soon Be Over !

A common question about insects when cold temperatures arrive is whether or not the cold will kill many pests. Although temperatures will occasionally drop below freezing in north Florida, it is normally not cold enough to significantly impact insect populations for the upcoming year. Typical white grub of the genus Phyllophaga. Photograph by John L. …

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Permanent link to this article: http://leon.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/03/02/insects-take-a-break-in-winter-which-will-soon-be-over/

The Preying Mantis: Friend to Gardeners, but Nightmare to Insects

The preying mantis is well equipped to thin the population of destructive insects. The last two years have been kind to the insect population in north Florida, and 2015 appears to be continuing the trend. The weather has provided enough rain for those bugs which depend on the generous supply of foliage and the temperatures …

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Permanent link to this article: http://leon.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/03/21/the-preying-mantis-friend-to-gardeners-but-nightmare-to-insects/

Tools for Trapping Pests and Attracting Beneficial Insects

Russ Mizell, UF/IFAS Professor of Entomology, NFREC Quincy Florida’s climate provides a long and often year-round growing season. Wherever crops are grown they attract insect and disease pests. As a result, growers are confronted with two major problems: detecting when pests arrive and determining how to manage them. All organisms have their own natural enemies …

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Permanent link to this article: http://leon.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2014/12/20/tools-for-trapping-pests-and-attracting-beneficial-insects/

Insects Take a Break in Winter

A common question about insects when cold temperatures arrive is whether or not the cold will kill many pests. Although temperatures will occasionally drop below freezing in north Florida, it is normally not cold enough to significantly impact insect populations for the upcoming year. Typical white grub of the genus Phyllophaga. Photograph by John L. …

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Permanent link to this article: http://leon.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2014/10/28/insects-take-a-break-in-winter/

Scouting Soybeans for Insects

Lots of things like to eat soybeans:  beetles, stink bugs, worms, leaf hoppers, grasshoppers and even deer.  During the pod-fill stage, we need to limit defoliation to less than 20%.  Around Labor Day, defoliation can be caused by velvetbean worms, corn earworms, armyworms, stink bugs, loopers and grasshoppers.  Soybean growers should scout their fields often …

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Permanent link to this article: http://leon.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2012/09/14/scouting-soybeans-for-insects/