Tag Archive: Using

Managing Dicamba Drift when using New Dicamba Resistant Cotton Varieties

Dicmaba drift injury versus healthy cotton without injury. Photo – Jay Ferrell Jay Ferrell, & Ramon Leon, UF/IFAS Weed Speciaslits R. and Ethan Carter, Regional Crop IPM Agent Dicamba drift injury on traditional cotton. Photo – Jay Ferrell. After many years in development, dicamba use in tolerant cotton varieties will likely be fully approved for …

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Permanent link to this article: http://leon.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/01/28/managing-dicamba-drift-when-using-new-dicamba-resistant-cotton-varieties/

Integrated Management of Tomato Bacterial Spot Using Bio-control Agents and Conventional Bactericides

Fig. 1. Severe leaf spot caused by Xanthomonas perforans, the causal agent for bacterial spot on tomato.  Photo:  Mathews Paret Mathews Paret, Laura Ritchie, Drey Clark and Josh Freeman, NFREC Quincy Situation Bacterial spot of tomato continues to be the topmost bacterial disease of economic importance in Florida with the potential of causing >20% yield …

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Permanent link to this article: http://leon.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/11/04/integrated-management-of-tomato-bacterial-spot-using-bio-control-agents-and-conventional-bactericides/

Using the Linear Bed Foot System for Vegetable Fertilization

Some production systems, particularly vegetables, utilize wide row spacing (anywhere from 4 to 8 foot wide). In these systems it is of economic and environmental importance to fertilize the crop root zones evenly, and not fertilize the row middles, where nutrients will go to waste or could even become a pollutant. The linear bed foot …

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Permanent link to this article: http://leon.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/08/26/using-the-linear-bed-foot-system-for-vegetable-fertilization/

Springtime is “Just Right” for Using Aquatic Herbicides

Monitor your ponds closely throughout the spring and make any necessary herbicide applications before weed growth becomes too excessive.Photo Credit: Mark Mauldin Similar to Goldilocks’ porridge, water temperature doesn’t need to be too hot or too cold, it needs to be just right for using aquatic herbicides (70o – 80o F). Here in Florida, these …

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Permanent link to this article: http://leon.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/04/17/springtime-is-just-right-for-using-aquatic-herbicides/